What Am I Reading?

Who am I reading? What am I watching and listening to? This is a list of the blogs and websites I keep close tabs on. Some are directly related to Eating Asturias. Some are similar sites covering other locations that serve as inspiration. Some are just interesting food blogs.

  • Cooking With Gaul – Anny Gaul thinks deeply about the history and context of the food of North Africa from an outsider perspective. And she has a banging bibliography at Zotero.
  • David Lebowitz – His love affair with Paris, food, and photography have been large, and obvious, influences on me.
  • Early Modern Recipe Collection Online – Is it a blog? Is it a journal? Is it a database? Yes! It also is the source of almost all transcriptions of recipes from the early modern period, and is invaluable for those of us who care about how foods evolve over time as they move from place to place.
  • Early Modern Spanish History Notes – Scott K. Taylor sifts all the recent scholarship on early modern period Spain, so I don’t have to.
  • Emily Contois – Food, identity, gender, and power in modern America. Quite possibly the most viciously trolled academic food blogger ever.
  • Food Anthropology – The blog of the Society for the Anthropology of Food & Nutrition is jam packed with research and resources from the Food Studies section of the American Anthropology Association.
  • Food Politics – Marion Nestle takes on corporate agriculture and the commercial food industry.
  • Food Rant – Ken Albala is one of the most important voices in food studies. He literally wrote the book on it…
  • Food Timeline – Well researched, properly sourced, and easy to search. Who could ask for anything more?
  • Jewish Viennese Food – Nino Shaye Weiss’ amazingly well footnoted food blog about the Jewish culinary traditions of Vienna
  • Mónica R. Goya – Lest I take myself too seriously, let me introduce you to the original English language chronicler of Asturian food culture.
  • Pass the Flamingo – Andrew Coletti started with a blog of amazing ancient recipes, and branched out into a food history YouTube series and what seems like a thousand other projects.
  • Petit Propos Culinaires – Tom Jaine’s continuation of the late Alan Davidson’s journal of food studies, now blessedly available in digitized form from 1979 to present.
  • Rachel Lauden – A Historian’s Take on Food and Food Politics. Her Getting Started in Food History pushed me to actually start.
  • Restaurant-ing through history – Jan Whitaker is the standard bearer for restaurant history as a subject, and feeds my ephemera hunger with a never ending supply of menus and stories.
  • Southern Foodways Alliance – One of the most vital voices in food studies, and an essential connection to my home region. Grows more precious to me every year I am gone.
  • American Culinary History – Beyond the Reading Room – University of Michigan Special Collections Research Center blogs about the history of food and eating in America through the lens of their culinary book collection.
  • Blind Pig & The Acorn – Tipper teaches Appalachian Cooking Classes at The John C. Campbell Folk School and writes the most impressive blog about Appalachian culture I have ever seen.

I am also deeply indebted to Emily Contois for maintaining the Index of Food Studies Journals, which is an invaluable resource (and which I regularly archive offline in the fear that her website might one day vanish).

There are also a number of local blogs about Asturias (or localities in Asturias) that have been invaluable to me.

  • Asturgeographic – and almost wordless blog chronicling the human geography of Asturias through excellent photography.
  • Belén Menéndez Solar – A close investigation of Hórreos and Paneras in Amieva conceyo
  • El blog de “Acedbedo” – A semi-anonymous blogger who chronicles both the history and the present activities of Mieres conceyo.
  • Caldones, Vegha y Valle de Ranón – Lorenzo Linares Fernández y Alejandro Muñiz blog about growing heirloom apples, walking through Sariego conceyo, and going “back to the land”.
  • Caleyando con Cienfuegos – An exhaustive catalog of hiking routes in Asturias, all minutely photographed and discussed.
  • Casonas de Indianos – A photographic inventory of the enormous houses the returning Asturians built once they made their fortunes overseas.
  • Club Xeitu – Dedicated to the cultural, architectural, anthropological, archaeological, artistic, ethnographic, linguistic and natural heritage of the western mountains of Asturias.
  • Cronista Oficial Concejo de Riosa – The official blog of Jose Luis Cabo Sariego, the historian for the conceyo of Riosa
  • Dendecagüelu – Luis Javier del Valle Vega has been writing about Asturian gastronomy since 2011.
  • Les Fartures – “The Eaters” The original independent restaurant reviewers in Asturias.
  • Flores y Paisajes de Asturias – Ignacio is obsessed with the flora of Asturias, which he has been diligently cataloging through amazing photography since 2013.
  • El Gijón que me gusta – Gres catalogs the architectural history of Gijón
  • Historia y Patrimonio de Riosa – Jose Luis Cabo Sariego, the historian for the conceyo of Riosa – but not in his official capacity.
  • Hórreos y paneras de Asturias – I really like hórreos, so there are plenty of blogs on this list dedicated to preserving images of these granaries.
  • Memoria del bosque – Ignacio Abella writes poetically about the trees and forests of Asturias.
  • La Nuestra Tierra – A David Graeber quoting group blog covering the neighboring territory of León. Well researched, well documented, well written.
  • Patrimonio Industrial Arquitectónico – Not solely focused on Asturias, but given the centrality of Asturian mining and manufacturing to Spain’s industrial history, much of this photo blog is about the area.
  • Pindio Pindio – Victor Manuel chronicles a life in topology. A true student of the mountains.
  • El rincón del entomólogo – Josep publishes photo essays following the field and back roads of Asturias.
  • Xuliocs – The website of Julio Concepción Suárez, a high school history teacher who dives deep into the past and present of Lena conceyo. He also maintains an amazing etymological dictionary of Asturian place names.